Interest in “Youth Hormone” Continues to Explode As an Entire Generation Refuses to Grow Old

LIGHTNING RELEASES: New York City (8/14/2014) — It’s been almost 25 years since Time magazine first proclaimed, “While HGH cannot make time stand still, it may help stave off some of the worst effects of aging…” Twenty-four years later, it’s still the hottest topic in anti aging. Once almost exclusively the domain of professional male athletes, human growth hormone is becoming the go-to for women across the country, who would swear on Ponce de Leon’s grave that it’s helped them both look AND feel younger — decades younger… and they’re willing to shell out thousands for it. And recently, another alternative has hit the market, an oral compound shown to increase mean growth hormone levels by 682%. Finally, a non-injectable, affordable (at least for some) solution.

But before we get to that, let’s understand why growth hormone therapy is such a hot topic for those who believe it can reduce wrinkles, tighten saggy skin, decrease body fat, increase lean muscle mass, strengthen bones and boost mood, while giving them plenty of energy and improving sex drive.

hGH therapy has — not surprisingly — become a huge trend among the Hollywood crowd. One filmmaker who spoke on the condition of anonymity told Vanity Fair, “I am one of the pathetically insecure Hollywood people who, like everyone else who lives here, is overly concerned with looks.” Once he hit his 50s, he began using hGH and claims, “It very much imbues you with a sense of clarity and confidence.”

And — quite surprisingly — unlike many Hollywood trends, this one actually has a basis in science. The hGH/aging link was sparked by a study published in the July 5, 1990 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, where after six months of growth hormone injections study subjects experienced a 14% decrease in body fat, a 9% increase in lean muscle mass and firmer skin.

Using human growth hormone as a form of anti-aging therapy is not without controversy, however. Some experts claim more studies need to be done on it, hGH injections are highly expensive (costs can run upwards of $1500 per month), and many argue against the use of these injections, which use a synthetic form of the hormone, because they fear that introducing synthetic hGH into the body may upset natural production.

But recently there was a game changer… an oral growth hormone booster called SeroVital®-hgh. This tiny little pill has been clinically validated to increase mean, serum (blood) hGH levels by 682%… without introducing synthetic hGH into the body. SeroVital doesn’t contain any hGH at all. Instead, it works by nourishing an aging pituitary — the gland that manufactures hGH — so it’s capable of producing growth hormone at more youthful levels. How unique is this compound? It’s been granted not one but seven United States Patents to protect the formula from imitators. To learn more, visit SeroVital.com. (If you decide to give it a try, use promo code SERO49 at checkout for free shipping**.)

Thanks to all the promises hGH may hold for health and aging, the hormone has been getting a lot of play in the media. Dr. Oz has done multiple episodes on hGH, including one called “Supercharge Your Body With Human Growth Hormone.” The New York Times ran an article online called “Vigor Quest” that spoke about hGH therapy. CNN, The Today Show, Fox News, The Doctors, Shape Magazine, Vanity Fair, and many, many more have all explored the touted benefits of human growth hormone. hGH has also been a major topic of interest at scientific conferences around the globe, from women’s conferences to anti-aging and beauty summits to obesity conferences and more.

So while science may not yet have found a way to “make time stand still,” many people believe human growth hormone holds the key to spending whatever time is allotted to them feeling younger, having more energy… and maybe even looking better than they did a decade ago.

*SeroVital-hgh is protected by U.S. Patent Numbers 8,551,542; 8,715,752; 8,722,114; 8,734,864; 8,747,921; 8,747,922 and 8,765,195.  These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. SeroVital-hgh is a dietary supplement and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

**Free standard shipping in the continental U.S. only.                             

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